The Quorum Community

This page is dedicated to users of the Quorum programming language. On it, we have placed some basic information for the current year on known organizations that either using it or plan to, how to get help, and where you can start a conversation with others on Quorum. Today, there are several ways to get help and lots of others that you can ask questions

New Users of Quorum

We are aware that there are many individuals or organizations out there that are using Quorum for projects or in the classroom, but that have not joined the community. If this is you and you want to tell us about how or what you are using it for, please fill out the survey below:


Tell us about how you are using Quorum

The best way we can help the community is by better understanding who is in it and what their needs are. So, if you are using Quroum and haven't told us about it, please do.

Getting Help

The Quorum community has a variety of active teachers, developers, and students, many of which that can answer questions about the language. For long or complicated questions, we encourage joining the Quorum Google Group. This group is private and requires membership, but all are welcome and membership is free. For short questions or general social interactions, please feel free to use Facebook or the Google Group. We ask all members to treat others with mutual respect. Users that are rude, unkind, or otherwise disruptive may be removed without warning.

A User Map

Below is a map of organizations that are using Quorum. When it began, Quorum was used exclusively at schools for the blind or visually impaired. Today, however, there is a diverse set of people using Quorum in the classroom, and likely for other purposes that we do not know. This list is not intended to be complete. It is just a sampling of the people that were kind enough to tell us they were using, or planning to use, Quorum in the classroom. In short, as of 2016, while Quorum has been downloaded all over the world, we can confirm courses are taught largely in the U.S. The majority of schools are now mainstream, but we maintain healthy relationships with residential schools for the blind or visually impaired as well.